Sunday, 10 March 2019

Love, Death & Robots




Two of my stories have been adapted as part of Tim Miller and David Fincher's new animated anthology series for Netflix, entitled Love, Death & Robots. The stories are Zima Blue, from 2004, and Beyond the Aquila Rift, from 2005. Although they're both approaching a decade and half old, and I've written a great deal since, I'd have to admit that they are still among my favorite personal stories. Both pieces lent their titles to collections, and both were originally bought by Peter Crowther, of PS Publishing, to whom I remain indebted. I'm very pleased that they've been adapted, and I look forward to seeing the episodes in their entirety. Aside from the stage production of Diamond Dogs (which was also a story bought by Peter!) these are the first adaptations of my work in any medium.

Here's a link to Netflix's own page for the series:


Be warned that the trailers are very much Not Safe For Work. There's a lot more out there if you're prepared to dig around, including some mini-trailers for the individual stories.

The series premiers on March 15th.








23 comments:

  1. Two of my favorite stories as well! Can't wait to see this series on Friday!

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  2. Awesome! "DisneyWood" could learn something from Netflix and HBO. They could learn that a lot of us read books as teenagers, not comic books.

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  3. Very good stories both of them.
    Mr.Reynolds Have you ever considered writing novel together with Peter Watts? I assume it might turn to be a great book
    Thanks

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  4. Wow. Would be incredible if this helps to pave the way for more adaptations of your work...

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  5. Congratulations! I'm really excited to see the results :)

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    1. Just wanted to add that I found them really good! Especially Zima Blue. Hoping to see more in the future! (although I still prefer the originals of course)

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  6. Hooray! Finally! hopefully this will be the start of many more AR adaptations to come! (here's hoping for a Netflix or Amazon RS series :) )

    And can you share anything about the process for you on this? Like, how were the stories chosen, etc?

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    1. About to say the same thing. So great to see my favourite author getting more exposure. Always imagined Poseidon's Children or RS would make incredible mind-blowing series on one of the big networks like HBO. Congrats!

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    2. I had no say in the process. I was approached via the Usual Channels about interest in adapting two of my short stories, and (after agreeing, and the usual contractual back-and-froing) that's more or less where my involvement ended. Blue studios actually acquired three of my pieces, but only because the reporter from Zima Blue shows up in another piece (The Real Story). But they only intended to make the two that they eventually did.

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    3. Ah, that's interesting. Wonder how they picked those 2 in the first place. Whether someone on the production side had already read and liked them, or whether someone else recommended them (or maybe you in general). Thanks for the insight!

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  7. Very cool! It's good to see your work adapted for the screen. Hope to see that happening more in the future!

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  8. I watched the Netflix "series." I liked some, did not care for several, but I loved Beyond the Aquila Rift. I loved the art style and seeing AR's work on screen was a true thrill. I would love nothing more than for more stories in the next season (if there is one), or better yet, make a movie version of Revelation Space in this same style. Congrats Alastair, this is awesome stuff.

    PS... I loved the Zima Blue short too but not as much as Aquila.

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  9. Just getting into the series. Still have Zima Blue to watch. Very good stuff overall. Nice to see some recognition for an author whose work (all of it) I've read. Trying to keep up: just starting Shadow Captain.

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  10. I really enjoyed Beyond the Aquila Rift. Although I haven't read the story for a number of years it soon came flooding back to me (I believe its one of only two of your stories where you use a kind of FTL transport method?). I always love it when you add some real chilling horror into your SF, reminding us that space travel through a vast cosmos would be a very scary thing!

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  11. Peter Hamilton and I went up to London last week to see six of the episodes, including Peter's Sonnie's Edge, and my Beyond the Aquila Rift. We enjoyed both our adaptations (Peter had seen his already) although I spent most of the time pinching myself that I was actually seeing one of my stories up on a screen. Obviously tastes are going to vary concerning the graphic content of both episodes (Peter's and mine), and I'll admit that there were aspects of my adaptation that really pushed me out of my comfort zone, but the execution was so gorgeous and immersive that I was left reeling, and I think the perspective shift at the end of Rift ... was handled very effectively. I gather from reports of people who have watched the episode again that there is a fair bit of subtle foreshadowing, so I look forward to re-watching it with a closer attention to detail. And, I'm very much looking forward to seeing Zima Blue.

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  12. I loved both adaptations. Beyond the Aquila Rift simply blew me away though. The CGI is simply amazing in it.

    One thing I've been pondering is the fact that they gave it quite a horror spin. Most people interpret the story as a parasite feeding on the hapless survivors. I re-read the story and to me it was always an act of compassion. An alien lifeform trying to console and care for the lost souls by slowly trying to get them to accept the fact that their previous lives are lost forever and to accept that they won't be able to return to the world they knew. Or is that just me?

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  13. I actually had managed to forget what exactly happens in both stories so the twist at the end still worked as a surprise, apart from the foreshadowing falling into place.

    The reveal of her true form at the end of Aquila Rift was brilliant! I understood it as him being fed a false reality from a benevolent creature, but still when she's revealed I got this visceral reaction of horror and disgust.

    And Zima Blue is just sooo beautiful. They took the story about an artist and made every single moment into a piece of art itself. It also fits so well with the story which is also somehow simple and neat and painfully beautiful.

    Not all of the other ones were quite for me, but the whole thing reminded me of the joy of scifi short story anthologies. I hope they continue with this :)

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  14. Echoing many of the comments here - I watched your two stories (on an unforgivably small screen) and I thought the adaptation of them was absolutely pitch-perfect. The CGI is just incredible. Started watching the rest - I had no idea "Sonnie's Edge" was a Peter F. Hamilton story, but I really enjoyed that one too.

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  15. General reaction online to the series, and your stories in particular, have been very positive. I've watched all 18 episodes, and with the exception of 2-3 they are all very good.

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  16. Alastair, are you embarrassed about how sexist these older stories appear now? Women as eye candy, victims, and girlfriends across the episodes including yours.

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